Updates

Seed Programs International

Students with Zimconserve in Zimbabwe

Earlier this year, SPI lost our founder, John Batcha, who passed away on June 23rd. In reflecting on his legacy and writings, John’s passion for improving the lives of children was a theme that he manifested through his work with SPI. We carry on his legacy by directly helping children now, and also by investing in the next generation who will lead their own communities to greater health, economic growth, and resilience to crisis.

“Poverty is as vicious and deadly as terrorism.” — The Times of India

We’ve created a world where 3 billion people live on less than $2.50 a day. Wars destroy homes and fields and displace families. In these human-made circumstances, kids suffer the most: poor nutrition is the leading cause of death for children under age 5. Children who grow up without sufficient nutrition live shorter lives and face ongoing health problems that affect their brain development and physical well-being.

John launched SPI to focus exclusively on vegetable seed. He knew that diets in the developing world are dominated by carbohydrates and that the nutrients in vegetables are essential for child development both in utero and during childhood.

MDRT Members Packing Seed to Fight HungerThis August, SPI got to travel around the world to host a seed packing event with our friends over at the Million Dollar Round Table (MDRT) during their first annual Global Conference in Sydney, Australia. MDRT’s charitable arm, MDRT Foundation, focuses on engaging, networking, and giving back through member and industry professional support to build stronger families and communities worldwide.

“It was inspiring to see one hundred of our members volunteer together to pack 20,000 seeds, knowing that so many lives would be changed. A big thank you to SPI for all the work they do to help feed and empower individuals and families from all over the world.” - Ted Rusinoff, MDRT Foundation President

Members packed carrots, swiss chard, lettuce, yellow onion, and butternut squash, reaching their 20,000 seed packet goal in two hours. That’s enough seed for people facing hunger and crisis to grow more than 50 tons of fresh vegetables!

The donated seed packets went to our new Australian partners: Quaker Service Australia, and Global Mission Partners. Seed from our packing event is going to South Sudan, Zimbabwe, Vanuatu, and other countries.

Garden Selfie!

Garden Selfie!

Hi folks,

If you’re familiar with our programs, you might know that many of our partner communities are located in outlying or isolated regions. Today’s report from the Rotary Club of Manila 101 in the Philippines is different. Working with schools throughout the Philippines, this Rotary focuses on gardens that can thrive in an urban environment.

“Urban Edible Gardening at the FMGES hopes to have pupils, as well as their parents and the community realize and be inspired with the benefits, feasibility, and potential of growing food for one’s own table.” — Urban Edible Gardening purpose statement

Their Agripreneruship and Environment flagship program, Urban Edible Gardening, introduces students to urban gardening concepts. This isn’t only a technical introduction — students are encouraged to explore their connection with the land and gain an understanding of how gardens and gardening can promote personal wellness. Learning about the connection between the land, where food comes from, and wellness is important in an urban setting where this connection may not be obvious.

GEA cooperative farmers at harvest.

GEA cooperative farmers at harvest.

Hi folks,

Today’s report comes from GrowEastAfrica in Ethiopia via Yohannes Chonde, GrowEastAfrica Co-Founder. One of our deeper partnerships, we try to understand what’s working for them, what’s not working, and how we can support their cooperative's growth and goals. This means not only learning how vegetables fit into their work, but also learning about how the other parts of their program fit into their broader aims.

If you’re not familiar with GrowEastAfrica, they’re a cooperative near Moyale in Ethiopia that prioritizes women’s access to resources like land, training, and tools. Many of the women are IDPs (Internally Displaced Persons) from tribes and regions that have been historically targeted for displacement.

Vegetables: Cabbage, Peppers, and Tomatoes

If you have been following GrowEastAfrica (GEA) through our reports, you’ll know the tremendous work that has gone into preparing and learning about their fields. Thanks to their planning and preparation, including negotiating cooperation with the surrounding community, their plots are irrigated and doing great. The cabbage doesn’t have any disease or pest issues, and the soil is perfect for the crop. The peppers are also growing well, though some of the plants appear weak.

Contact Us

Seed Programs International

PO Box 9163
Asheville, NC 28815
+1-828-337-8632

 

Seed Programs Canada (Affiliate)

Registered Charity No. 839858107RR0001
Lombardy, ON
613-406-6100

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Seed Programs International (SPI)

Seed Programs InternationalSeed Programs International (SPI) is a non-profit, tax exempt, non-governmental humanitarian organization.

We work thorough other humanitarian organizations, church groups, service clubs and individual donors, to provide quality seed to impoverished communities in developing countries enabling them to grow some of their own food. In addition to seed, SPI provides critical seed expertise and experience operating seed based self help programs.”

SPI is operated by individuals with over 50 years seed industry experience plus over 20 years experience in vegetable research and production. We also have 15 years experience operating programs that have successfully shipped seed to over 70 countries on five continents. SPI has shipped enough seed to plant over 1,000,000 vegetable gardens, providing more than 20 kinds of vegetables that are rich in vitamins and minerals often missing in people’s diets.